April 22, 2017

Avoidance, aka Environmental Control:
Board-certified doctors' orders.

The AMA, the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology
(the AAAAI), and the American Lung Association (the ALA) have all
acknowledged the following:

They acknowledged the existence of Chemical Sensitivity as it applies
to Asthma and Asthma-like conditions, as well as sinusitis and adverse
skin conditions such as dermatitis and urticaria (rashes.)  This includes

1}  Occupational Asthma due to Low Weight Molecular Agents,
2}  Irritant-associated Vocal Cord Dysfunction.
3} Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome,
4)  Irritant-induced Asthma, .
5} Small Airways Disease.

All three associations have acknowledged that chemical-bearing agents can
trigger asthma attacks in susceptible persons. This includes chemically laden
fragrance products.  In as much everyone on earth needs air to breath.  No one
needs vain and gluttonous amounts of artificial fragrances products.

Each organization advocates the practice of Environmental Control; 
of avoiding airborne agents which trigger one's asthma.   In fact, the
AMA has formally referred to Avoidance as "Control of Factors Con-
tributing to Asthma Severity."   In French medical Literature, avoid-
ance is known as "Strict Eviction."  

Examples of recognized asthma triggers in the chemical category
include:

[A] "NO2" from gas stoves and fireplaces,  fumes from
        kerosene heaters, and volatile organic compounds
        from carpeting, cabinetry, plywood, particle board,
         and fumes from household cleaning products."

[B] "Air pollutants such as tobacco smoke, wood smoke,
        chemicals in the air and ozone"

      "Occupational exposure to vapors, dusts, gases or fumes"

      "Strong Odors or sprays such as perfumes, household clean-
        sers, cooking fumes (especially from frying), paints, or var-
        nishes"

[C] "Perfume, paint, hair spray, or any strong odors or fumes."

http://www.epa.gov/asthma/chemical_irritants.html

http://asthma.about.com/od/asthmatriggers/qt/chemictriggers.htm

http://www.aaaai.org/patients/publicedmat/tips/occupationalasthma.stm

http://www.lungusa.org/healthy-air/home/resources/cleaning-supplies.html

http://www.lungusa.org/lung-disease/asthma/about-asthma/understanding-asthma.html

http://www.lungusa.org/lung-disease/asthma/living-with-asthma/take-control-of-your-asthma/asthma-triggers.html

An American Lung Association already stated:

"Perfume, room deodorizers, cleaning chemicals, paints, and
  talcum powder are examples of triggers that must be avoided
  or kept at very low levels."

The same American Lung Association furthermore states:

"These 'triggers' can set off a reaction in your lungs and   other 
  parts of your body." Now, place an emphasis on "other parts
  of your body," and keep in mind that:

Avoidance also applies to Anaphylaxis, Chemically-induced Hepatitis,
Irritant Rhinitis, Dermatitis, Urticaria (rashes), Irritant-associated Vo-
cal Cord Dysfunction, Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome, etc.

The AMA's Admitting to the Converse Relationship Between 
Pollution Levels and Hospital Admissions Due to Asthma

Five to six thousand people die each year from asthma, in the United
States alone, and one of the highest asthma-related death rates has
been in Harlem, NY, as well as Detroit.   Ever so coincidentally, the
environs of Harlem are venues for NYC waste sites. Concerning this,
the AMA has expressly stated that:

"fluctuations in the levels of air pollution correlate with asth-
 ma symptoms and hospital admissions."   [Report 4 of the AMA's
 Council on Scientific Affairs (A-98)]
===============================================

The segment posted below appears in another Atlantic America article.
This means that it might look familiar to you.  In fact, the information in
quotations, as well as the asthma chart, was provided by the American
Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology, in its publican information
literature.  Needless to say, charts can be invaluable for individuals seek-
ing to learn fact. 

The AAAAI's public education material 
on the subject of Occupational Asthma

Concerning the AAAAI that Barrett cited in his campaign to convince
mankind that Environmental Illness is merely a matter of mental illness,
it published an instructional website about Occupational Asthma.  The
AAAAI has already acknowledged that Occupational Asthma can be
caused by a number of chemicals at nontoxic/ambient levels, afflicting
a number of  workers employed in a number of  industries.

     Acrylates  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adhesive handlers
     Amines  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Shellac & lacquar handlers
     Anhydrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plastic, epoxy resin users
     Chloramine-T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Janitors, cleaning staff
     Dyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . Textile workers
     Fluxes   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electronic workers
     Formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde . . .  Hospital staff
     Persulfate  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hairdressers
     Isocyanates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spray painters, Insulation
                                                               installers; plastic, rubber,
                                                               foam manufactory workers.

         The same public education material of  the AAAAI states:

          "The cause may be allergic or nonallergic in nature,
            and the disease may last for a lengthy period in some  
            workers, even if they are no longer exposed to the
            agents that caused their symptoms
."

           "Inhalation of  some substances in aerosol form can
            directly lead to the accumulation of  naturally oc-
            curring chemicals in the body, such as histamine or 
            acetylcholine within the lung, which in turn lead to 
            asthma."

            "For example, insecticides, used in agricultural work,
            can cause a buildup of  acetylcholine, which causes
            airway muscles to contract, thereby constricting air-
            ways."

           "Allergic occupational asthma can occur in workers
            in the plastic, rubber or resin industries following
            repeated exposure to small chemical molecules in 
            the air."

          "If occupational asthma is not correctly diagnosed
           early, and the worker protected or removed from the
          exposure, permanent lung changes may occur and 
          asthma symptoms may persist even without exposure."

          "Up to 15% of  asthma cases in the United States may
           have job-related factors."

          "Isocyanates are chemicals that are widely used in many 
           industries, including spray painting, insulation installa-
           tion, and in manufacturing plastics, rubber and foam.
           These chemicals can cause asthma in up to 10% of ex-
           posed workers."

The aforementioned illustrates that Chemical Sensitivity, as it applies to
asthma and rhinitis, is acknowledged as valid and authentic by the same
AAAAI that Barrett elected to use, in order to support his assertion that
chemical sensitivity is merely a psychological illness.

Conclusion

Stephen Barrett can mock the diagnostic title, Multiple Chemical Sensi-
tivity, all that he wants to.  It will not take away the fact is that chemical
sensitivity has already been recognized in case specific form.  Nor will
it take away the fact that the sufferers of those case-specific forms of
chemical sensitivity need to avoid the chemicals which exacerbate their
medical conditions.
_________________
The following quote is
directly from the AMA 

Avoidance and AMA (CSA) Report 4 (A-98)

Avoidance is not 'detrimental.'  Nor is it nonsense.  Avoidance is a
medical necessity.  And as it applies to asthma, the AMA has stated:

   Regardless of the efficiency of clinician assessment and pa-
   tient self-monitoring, if the patient's exposure to irritants
   or allergens to which he or she is sensitive is not reduced 
   or eliminated, symptom control and exacerbation rate may
   not improve.  Formerly titled 'Environmental Control,' the
   key points in this area logically include efforts by clinicians
   to pinpoint causative agents and to provide specific advice 
   on how to avoid or reduce exposures to environmental or
   dietary triggers and drugs that may provoke or exacerbate 
   symptoms." AMA Report 4, Council on Scientific Affairs (A-98)
   ============================================